February 22, 2009

An Interview with FedEx CEO Fred Smith

SF Chronicle:
Frederick W. Smith, the founder, president, chairman and CEO of FedEx, built the first overnight express delivery company in the world, starting in 1971. Today, FedEx, based in Memphis, has service in more than 220 countries and territories.

Like most other businesses, FedEx is encountering economic turmoil and is operating by Smith's belt-tightening orders. He cut his own salary by 20 percent.

Legend has it that Smith, 64, outlined his concept for FedEx in a paper in an economics class at Yale University for which he earned a C. (He corrects the record in this interview.) At Yale, he was a friend and fraternity brother of former President George W. Bush, to whom he believes history ultimately will be more kind.

In the Marine Corps in Vietnam, Smith received the Silver Star, the Bronze Star and two Purple Hearts as a platoon leader and forward air controller. It was there that he observed military procurement and delivery procedures and thought he could improve on them.

Smith is unwavering in his belief that U.S. corporate tax policy must change, but practical enough to know that the new administration and Congress will not go along with the idea. He still believes one aspect could be enacted - accelerating the expensing of capital investment that would put money into corporate hands sooner.
Posted by James Zellmer at February 22, 2009 8:21 PM | Subscribe to this site via RSS:
Posted to Business | Entrepreneurs | Politics | Taxes